Heroes Of Our Own Story

ktempest:

Models have to have dead face when they walk the runway. Gina Torres is smiling like she is the most bestest ever in that dress (and she is)

(Source: 1beaut, via historybutts)

— 6 hours ago with 24163 notes
#gina torres  #beautiful lady  #that last gif 

Cooking with Ghibli!

(Source: studio-ghibli-gifs, via oh-totoro)

— 2 days ago with 25203 notes
"What I want to talk about is how emotional outbursts typically more associated with men (shouting, expressing anger openly) are given a pass in public discourse in a way that emotional outbursts typically more associated with women (crying, “getting upset”) are stigmatized. I wish to dispel the notion that women are “more emotional.” I don’t think we are. I think that the emotions women stereotypically express are what men call “emotions,” and the emotions that men typically express are somehow considered by men to be something else. This is incorrect. Anger? EMOTION. Hate? EMOTION. Resorting to violence? EMOTIONAL OUTBURST. An irrational need to be correct when all the evidence is against you? Pretty sure that’s an emotion. Resorting to shouting really loudly when you don’t like the other person’s point of view? That’s called “being too emotional to engage in a rational discussion.” Not only do I think men are at least as emotional as women, I think that these stereotypically male emotions are more damaging to rational dialogue than are stereotypically female emotions. A hurt, crying person can still listen, think, and speak. A shouting, angry person? That person is crapping all over meaningful discourse."

Bullish Life: When Men Get Too Emotional To Have A Rational Argument

(via introvertedactivist

(via vomohiper)

THIS! And this is why I think it is so important to reject the false binary of “logic vs. emotion.” We are taught to believe that what men think/feel/do = “not emotion” and what women think/feel/do “is emotion,” where “emotional” is a pejorative against women.

(via bapgeek)

(Source: champagnecandy, via hashiebrowns)

— 4 days ago with 14690 notes

neptuneisforlovers:

autremondeimagination:

RMIT University lecturer Dr. Claudia Diaz’s senior anatomy students get an interesting hands-on lesson by painting the human musculoskeletal system on a live model 

thought this was elaborate SNK cosplay

(Source: staceythinx, via historybutts)

— 6 days ago with 69958 notes
flinch-nerds:

This tweet is so important to me

flinch-nerds:

This tweet is so important to me

(via kateordie)

— 1 week ago with 336375 notes
nprplays:

From the New Yorker: The Guilt of the Video-Game Millionaires

"One night in March, 2013, Rami Ismail and his business partner Jan Willem released a game for mobile phones called Ridiculous Fishing. Ismail, who was twenty-four at the time and who lives in the Netherlands, woke the following morning to find that the game had made him tens of thousands of dollars overnight. His first reaction was not elation but guilt. His mother, who has a job in local government, had already left for work. “Ever since I was a kid I’ve watched my mom wake up at six in the morning, work all day, come home, make my brother and me dinner—maybe shout at me for too much ‘computering,’ ” he said. “My first thought that day was that while I was asleep I’d made more money than she had all year. And I’d done it with a mobile-phone game about shooting fish with a machine gun.”

If you follow the gaming industry, especially the indie scene, you’ve probably heard some variations on this story regarding coping with overnight success. This New Yorker piece paints an interesting picture of some of those experiences. As this happens more and more, with games by small and solo developers able to gain mass success, I like the idea of a support structure in place to help those that need help in dealing with it so they can continue to make games instead of more brilliant developers flaming out early.

nprplays:

From the New Yorker: The Guilt of the Video-Game Millionaires

"One night in March, 2013, Rami Ismail and his business partner Jan Willem released a game for mobile phones called Ridiculous Fishing. Ismail, who was twenty-four at the time and who lives in the Netherlands, woke the following morning to find that the game had made him tens of thousands of dollars overnight. His first reaction was not elation but guilt. His mother, who has a job in local government, had already left for work. “Ever since I was a kid I’ve watched my mom wake up at six in the morning, work all day, come home, make my brother and me dinner—maybe shout at me for too much ‘computering,’ ” he said. “My first thought that day was that while I was asleep I’d made more money than she had all year. And I’d done it with a mobile-phone game about shooting fish with a machine gun.”

If you follow the gaming industry, especially the indie scene, you’ve probably heard some variations on this story regarding coping with overnight success. This New Yorker piece paints an interesting picture of some of those experiences. As this happens more and more, with games by small and solo developers able to gain mass success, I like the idea of a support structure in place to help those that need help in dealing with it so they can continue to make games instead of more brilliant developers flaming out early.

— 1 week ago with 86 notes

oliviawhen:

A truly unstoppable force.

(via historybutts)

— 1 week ago with 41339 notes